Unionism and unison; which is lacking in CMUL (College of Medicine, University of Lagos) by Oluwakemisola Agoyi

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The effect of the protest that ensued in Akoka somehow found its way into the College of Medicine, University of Lagos in Idi-araba, as it is an extension of the University of First Choice. Where it was said that, all academic activities should be put on hold till all issues on ground is being resolved.

After all this has been said, and the Idi-arabites were been exempted from the all students should vacate the hostels and school premises by the management due to some obvious reasons; some elements still decided to go their own way and continue with academic activities In the school premises, opposing the message sent across by the Deputy Provost, the University’s management as a whole and both the unionism and unison spirit of the students themselves.

The issue of some people saying one thing and others disagreeing has been a long known one, but the part of not addressing pressing important issues together in a right way is really getting out of hands. This brings me to my statement and question, “unionism and unison; which is lacking in CMUL?”

First off, I know unionism exists in the college, at least we hear about COMPSSA, PANS, AMSUL and the likes. And there are CMUL students representatives in the almighty ULSU itself, although some idi-arabites believe that “WHO ULSU EPP” in CMUL and that the ULSU/Akokaites protest was a pointless one and should not involve them (the idi-arabites – when they are the ones with the most suffering) ‘cause whatever is going on in UNILAG is a National issue and the management cannot help (which I believe is a delusion though, ‘cause the reasons for the protest are listed here http://unilagnews.com/2016/04/11/press-club-release-on-the-unilag-protest/).

But now, is there really unionism in CMUL? Where the struggle is realer and deeper, where there is actually no water, no light, no generator, no good bathroom or toilet, where the bed bugs and verminous rats have become bed mates and roommates, around to stay, where all to enjoy is – stay away, smile and suffer in silence. To some extent with actions based evidence I believe there is a form of unionism; might not be the type to protest or carry placards but they are there, strong in their territory and trying their “best”.

Unison, I believe is key to unionism. If unison is zero, unionism cannot really go far, they can only thrive and this is the case of things in CMUL. Where Unionism is trying and unison is dragging them back; unison in cells that makes up the unionism. That is why the union would say, “School management has put a stop to all academic activities” and unison would say “no, we want to graduate before our counterpart, we have to continue our own personal academic activities”, which is really sad.

The unison I am talking about is not that to be rebellious, its unison to pass a message across and not be quiet to keep struggling, striving and suffering in silence while we learn and train. Unison; to see what is wrong and voice it out, unison to make a decision and stand by it, unison to hear a decision and make the best use of it for all, without being biased, unison to hear a decision that would not favour all and stand against it.

In this situation, I have come to see that Unionism, is not actually the problem (not only in CMUL, it cuts across); unison and blindly or ignorantly misplaced priorities are. Thinking just the one-way-trip of graduation at a set time out of school is the ultimate, while damning other things that might come up along the way. But this notion is wrong, because if these other things coming up goes way beyond control, we “all” would be in it together and there is no running anywhere from it (just keep calm and think about it.)

Lastly, in unionism and unison, “clarifications” need to be differentiated from “point making”, and “personal or selfish opinion and benefits” need to differentiate from “welfare for all”.

Discussion2 Comments

  1. Abeg, who Ulsu epp? The situation at idi araba did not start yesterday. It has been a perennial problem. Ulsu has been around for more than a year now, it’s really interesting that they only showed interest in idi araba when they experienced the same. Ulsu should be for Unilag as a whole, not for Akoka. It is sad that issues have to affect Akoka before being deemed worthy to protest about. Abeg who Ulsu epp?
    That said, the students that insist on having classes, and the lecturers that insist on giving them are both flaunting a clear directive. That should be condemned. Still until Ulsu show it is for unilag, not Akoka, ‘Unionism’ abi na ‘Unison’ would remain elusive.

  2. I find a lot of faults in this article. Let’s begin with the part where you blame students for going to school, even when the deputy provost has said we shouldn’t.
    In 500L MBBS, the provost clearly stated that we are not part of the exemption because our program me involved careful planning . so are you trying to say via this post that we should “rebel”, not go to school when they have clearly state reasons?

    Secondly, concerning us not joining ULSU, I say and state. We won’t join ULSU in their protest. When they enjoy light and all the good things. They never remember CMUL. When did CMUL become part of them. Only when they need votes and people to fight. “Hunny” we are bigger than that.

    Other classes and departments have put a hold in classes except 500l and like I typed earlier, they stated their reasons.

    Here in LUTH, we believe in peace and dialogue. Dialogue, one of the things people should advocate for and even the writer advocates for this.. There is nothing peaceful about a protest.

    In CMuL, the provost already addressed us, should we go ahead and fight?

    It annoys me when I hear we are not speaking. We are Speaking. We are just not fighting, because fighting doesn’t help anyone.

    If you don’t want to attend classes. I mean, its fine. But don’t bully people with words like unionism and all that.

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